Gettin my learn on.

I learned some new things today that I’d like to share.  Since today is a day of lists here’s another short one:

#1.  If you live in DC, you’re in luck.  I just found some seriously local yarn sold at the Proper Topper in Georgetown (but not at the Dupont Circle location).  It’s made from a sheep farm in Loudoun County, Virginia, which thanks to good ole SUBurban sprawl is now considered just over the river.  As far as farming is concerned, it’s definitely among the most local to DC you could possibly get, unless you managed to squeeze a sheep in the small backyard of your rowhouse.  In any case, I forget the name of the stuff and I didn’t get to check out all of the colors, but I’ll be trying it out at some point and will share more then.  It’s exciting to find a yarn finally that’s truly locally sourced. Yay!

#2.  My dad told me a lovely story today about cooking rice.  Apparently back in the day, while growing up in Northern India, they would make rice by boiling it in water and then draining the starch-laden water, much the same as we do with pasta.  The way I’ve seen most folks make rice these days is to use the exact amount of water necessary leaving nothing to drain.  The way my father used to do it eliminates most of the starch in white rice, making it much healthier. Now the best part is that they then used the starchy water to starch their laundry! They would rinse their clean clothes in the starchy water and then hang them out to dry…presto, starched clothes.  Spray starch is rendered useless and the earth can smile.  or at least crack one for a sec.

How’s that for some recycling?

 

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One Response to “Gettin my learn on.”

  1. Cooking Of Rice Now And Then « Aarvidi’s Weblog Says:

    […] Gettin my learn on. « Textiles and Bicycles  My dad told me a lovely story today about cooking rice.  Apparently back in the day, while growing up in Northern India, they would make rice by boiling it in water and then draining the starch-laden water, much the same as we do with pasta.  The way I’ve seen most folks make rice these days is to use the exact amount of water necessary leaving nothing to drain.  The way my father used to do it eliminates most of the starch in white rice, making it much healthier. Now the best part is that they then used the starchy water to starch their laundry! They would rinse their clean clothes in the starchy water and then hang them out to dry…presto, starched clothes.  Spray starch is rendered useless and the earth can smile.  or at least crack one for a sec. […]

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